Checklists

3 Geeks and a Law Blog publishes best of '09

3 Geeks and a Law Blog publishes best of '09

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Greg Lambert, 3 Geeks and a Law Blog, just posted the ’09 list of must read blog posts. Gathering suggestions from his Twitter community, this list rocks. So far there are 150 posts. And we’re only in the first half of ’09.

There’s so much great stuff here it will take me all year to read them. My plan is to read one a day for the next 145 days. (I already read 5 and the inspiration factor is off the scale. Check out The Sun, The Cave, Enterprise 2.0 and the Ah Ha Moment on Cheryl McKinnon’s blog Candy and Asprin. The 2 minute video at the end is a treat.)

Thanks Greg (@glambert) and everyone who contributed selections. This a true example of community. What did we do before the Web went 2.0? Not to worry. No looking back.

To Block or Not to Block the Social Web at Work.

To Block or Not to Block the Social Web at Work.

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Does blocking access to social networking sites at the office really work? Are social networking sites the only places of risk for companies and law firms on the new social Web?

Do you know that if your partners and employees can access blogs and other sites that allow commenting, reviewing, or streaming content (e.g. news videos or podcasts), via the firm Internet connection, you are, by default, giving them permission to participate in the social web.

Law firms need viable responses to the new way in which people are using the web. Shutting off access to social networking sites isn’t the last decision you’ll make.

So what should law firm leaders do? Here are a few suggestions that I recommend.

Facebook Friday

Facebook Friday

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FACEBOOK Friday? What’s that?

Well, it’s kind of like a “jeans day.” Remember them? Well, this is no facebooking during regular business hours, except on Facebook Fridays which is once a month or once a week. You choose. Employees still have to do their work, but when they have a free minute, they’re free to play around on social sites –within the limits of company social media policy, of course.

Since it’s Friday, and I get this question quite often, I thought I’d share a quick lesson on how to set up lists on facebook and customize privacy settings accordingly. This allows you to give your business and personal contacts different access to your stuff.

Can a social media policy be too restrictive?

Can a social media policy be too restrictive?

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You know your culture better than anyone, so use that as a filter for decision-making. Every firm is different. It certainly is the administrator’s job to look for the loopholes and the worst-case scenario, BUT if you make something a bigger deal than it is, it will become exactly that. Permission based policy works better than restrictive policy.

Mining Existing Content for the Social Web

Mining Existing Content for the Social Web

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Markerters, this one’s for you. Part of the VirtualMarketingOfficer’s mission is to pass along ideas to make your job easier. So, if you’ve been tasked with setting up or directing a social Web program in your firm, here are your first 4 steps.

Lawyers on the Ledge

Lawyers on the Ledge

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But as in all things related to social networks, online or offline, they will only be as good as the people who show up. A social network host can provide the best tool in the world, but if it isn’t easy to use, if it doesn’t catch on, if the community isn’t full of creators and thought leaders, but rather just spectators, it will be just another online directory or dead social network.

20 things law firms need to have in their social media guidelines.

20 things law firms need to have in their social media guidelines.

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18) Do not use the firm logo without permission from the marketing department.
19) The best way to launch a new policy is to frame it with context. Educate everyone in your firm regarding your policy. Do a video presentation and require new employees to watch it.
20) Call Jayne at LawGravity.com, she can help you make this exercise painless.